thesweetestcunt:

fitmunk:

fitmunk:

Do I need to turn in my fitblr card?

in my defense… sprinkles. on a milkshake. and it was a peanut butter shake. still in a food coma

zomg I want burger fi

now I want burger fi

thesweetestcunt:

fitmunk:

fitmunk:

Do I need to turn in my fitblr card?

in my defense… sprinkles. on a milkshake.

and it was a peanut butter shake.

still in a food coma

zomg I want burger fi

now I want burger fi

thesweetestcunt:

This is fucking hilarious.

(Source: tastefullyoffensive)

kakarikokid:

there’s nothing more satisfying than being an asshole in mario kart

(via sombies)

supernatural-who-lock:

shadows-of-a-fallen-angel:

fully-baked:

This nigga just copped a super Mario star he invincible af nah but forreal tho somebody explain this

Metallic silver coating, does rainbow effect thing when passing lights

thank you car side of tumblr

supernatural-who-lock:

shadows-of-a-fallen-angel:

fully-baked:

This nigga just copped a super Mario star he invincible af
 nah but forreal tho somebody explain this

Metallic silver coating, does rainbow effect thing when passing lights

thank you car side of tumblr

(Source: mrcheyl, via bandgeeklikeme)

spookbeast:

come on and slam

spookbeast:

come on and slam

(via bandgeeklikeme)

agirlnamedagnes:

This is what my husband and I purchased at the grocery store the other day.

We don’t have kids.

We are adults. We pay bills.
And drink water from a whale.

(via thelovelysunflower)

boyzoo:

Chris Evans & Chris Hemsworth at San Diego Comic-Con

boyzoo:

Chris Evans & Chris Hemsworth at San Diego Comic-Con

(via mermaid-megan)

(Source: yzma, via lovelyflockofcats)

Andy Serkis is in age of ultron and I’m trying to figure out what character he could possibly play, there is no information other than his studio did the mo-cap for the film and he has a role where he talks to ultron (as per James spader)

Either he has a cameo or he being Andy serkis has a role that will expand into the MCU and I can’t figure it out, apparently his character has a beard so I guess that narrows it down?

okie-dokie-froakie:

Not gonna lie, I feel like this commercial was promoting becoming a member of Team Rocket more than becoming a trainer.

(Source: shadowzone1996, via lovelyflockofcats)

wifipassworcl:

when someone takes forever to reply

image

(via menacet0s0briety)

candice-bear:

Wow.

anon25494 said: What skills (Teachable and "unteachable") would you stress at each position in order to succeed?

we-breathe-quidditch:

Every physical attribute is teachable. If you have that sort of mentality, you can become a great player. No matter if you’re male/female/trans* or whether you weigh 110 pounds or 250.

Beater 

To be a good beater, you need to be fast. Bludger control decides most games, and obtaining bludger control on brooms up shapes the course of a game more than people realize. For chasers, pure sprinting ability doesn’t matter as much. So you lose one quaffle. Big deal, that will rarely change the outcome of a game. If you lose a bludger because you weren’t fast enough to beat your opponent to a bludger, you could have just lost your team the game. 

To be a good beater, you need to be accurate. Most good beaters can sprint very well and so naturally prefer to sprint closer to their opponents, but all great beaters can reliably hit a target from a distance. If you miss a shot, the best outcome you can hope for is that you just have to run a lot and tire yourself out. Worst case scenario, your misfire leads to a loss of bludger control. 

 

These are all things you can train yourself to do in the gym. 

Not every mental attribute is teachable. But every mental attribute is learnable.  You can tell a person what to do in every beating situation that arises but beaters have to react on instinct. 

To be a great beater you need to be imperturbable and patient. Even the best beaters in the nation lose bludger control, sometimes multiple times in one game. If you lose bludger control, you will probably have a hard time getting it back. On average it takes roughly 8 drives for most teams to get bludger control back. But the definition of average is that there exist times that it will take much longer than 8 drives. Some beaters starting out get restless and make mistakes that only lead to them not getting bludger control for even longer. Beating is a game of instinct and strategy not of heated emotion. 

To be a great beater, you have to be aware. Since loss of control is often a big deal, you must (as the saying goes) have eyes on the back of your head. You must know when there is an opposing beater  behind you ready to run after any ball you throw. You must know whether the friendly beater behind you is caught up in play or whether she can easily help in keeping control safe. 

To be a great beater, you need to react automatically. Too often, even on some of the better teams out there, I see beaters throw a bludger and slowly walk as they watch the bludger to make sure it hits its mark. It’s a natural reaction. The best beaters (Texas State is a good example) will react. By the time the bludger leaves their hand they are already starting to run towards their target. By the time the bludger hits the target they are already ready to pick it up. 

Beating is a very strategic game. But the best beaters do not think. They know. This is something that can’t be taught and must be learned through experience and by watching elite beaters playing 

On Ball Quaffle player

On ball quaffle players (point defenders and most keepers) must - absolutely must be able to drive past an opponent on offense and stop an opponent on defense. Great keepers can drive through an entire squad. This is not necessary, but if you can’t break point, you are looking at long passes that can easily be intercepted. Even if said passes are caught, they give the beaters more time to react and thus make them more likely to make a beat. 

Great point defenders are not players that will necessarily tackle the ball carrier 90% of the time. Hell great point defenders might not even tackle the ball carrier 50% of the time. The point of a point defender(hah) is to stop the momentum of the ball carrier. As a point defender your job is to prevent a ball carrier from sprinting down the center of the field. If you push the ball carrier to the sides of the pitch or even if you slow his/her momentum down significantly you have succeeded. 

These are all gameplay attributes. One-on-one drills are the primary tool to success with this position. 

As an on ball quaffle player, you must be

1) fast to zip past a point defender on offense and fast to quickly be able to get in position to play point defender

2) fearless. An on ball quaffle player scared of contact is useless. 

3) relentless. A point defender’s primary responsibility is to keep the quaffle carrier in front of him, regardless of how many fakes/jukes/spins the opponent does. I’ve seen a point defender stick with a quaffle carrier for 20 seconds and more because his beaters were involved with bludger play. As a ball carrier, you will either have to sprint pasts point, or more likely power your way through point with a series of spins/fakes/hand-switches etc. 

Off Ball Quaffle Player

An off ball quaffle player’s jobs are simple. 

On offense he is to 1) get open 2) finish

On defense she is to 1) stay on her person. 2) maybe tackle if necessary.

For #1) getting open and staying on person the most fundamental skill is to be agile, to be able to make quick cuts. 

For #2) a player must be tough. I remember dealing with new recruits. One of the hardest things to get a new recruit to do, strangely enough is finish. He would get open near the hoops, he would get a perfect pass and catch it. He would lack the basic drive to charge forward 7 feet and put the damn quaffle through the damn hoop. Most competitive players are way more skilled than this but the fact stands. A chaser must finish. (S)he must dodge bludgers and drive through one or two opponents. On defense (she) must make a tackle and do whatever it takes to stop a play. 

Seekers

Seekers have to

1) catch the snitch.

I’d end this response right here, but I’m afraid people would misinterpret. The only requirement of a seeker is that they can catch the snitch. Sure you would want to have your seeker be fast so they can catch the snitch, tough to plow through a snitch’s arms and relentless so that they keep getting up after every throw and beat. But take Team USA seeker Sam Roitblat. Yes he’s tough. Yes he’s fast. And yes he’s relentless. Yet there are seekers tougher and stronger than him.

You could give me the fastest NFL player but the fact remains he wouldn’t be able to catch the snitch as well as the likes of Roitblat, Aleman, Rudolph, etc. These people all just… catch the snitch. They have the intuition that they know when to attack and how to attack. 

Take the A&M-LSQC game for example. LSQC was dominating the quaffle game. LSQC’s seeker played a physical seeking game. Chris Scholz occupying the snitch completely so that he couldn’t turn in time to deal with A&M seeker Luke Wigley sprinting down the field. This isn’t the first time a very relentless/fast/tough seeker has given up a snitch in this way. This was the same way Baylor undid then Texas seeker Kody Marshall in the VI season to give Baylor its first win against Texas. 

Anybody who’s played against or even watched film of Team USA chaser Kody Marshall knows he’s one of the toughest, fastest, and most relentless players on the pitch, and Chris Scholz is no slouch either. What differentiates these two from seekers the likes of Aleman and Zagelbaum?

Instinct. Aleman’s style is perfect both for him and for preventing physical overextention on the snitch. Zagelbaum and Roitblat know precisely when to attack and when to work their way from around an opponent seeker. 

Yes you seeker should be fast, relentless, and tough. But most of all you must have this something - this unknowable quality - that actually makes you finish and catch the snitch. This is the most difficult quality to learn and is the only quality that is completely impossible (imo) to teach. 

unamusedsloth:

If Daenerys went to Starbucks… [via]

(via mtchstrr)